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COMPETITION – Manley Labs Celebrate 30 Years!

COMPETITION – Manley Labs Celebrate 30 Years!

To celebrate, we are giving one lucky Manley fan a piece of gear that has been in constant production since the earliest days:
The Manley Enhanced Pultec Equalizer.

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It’s our longest-continuously-in-production piece. Way back in the day, we were given the blessing of one Mr. Eugene Shenk (the Pultec’s original designer) to use the Pultec name and produce our own updated version, and we never stopped making them. From drums to vocals to guitars, people seem to love the Manley Pultec on just about everything.

So how do I win it, we hear you ask?

Simple: if you’ve used a piece of Manley gear over the last thirty years, we want you to tell the world what you love about it.

All you have to do is review at least one of your favorite Manley product(s) on at least one of your favorite websites. Write your review, copy the URL of the review page, and upload that URL via the form on this page (scroll down) to enter to win. And if you REALLY want to win, multiple entries are possible…check out the rules below for more details.

The winner will be announced during the 2019 Winter NAMM Show in Anaheim, California. GOOD LUCK!

ENTER HERE!

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Is It Fender or The True Spring Reverb?

Is It Fender or The True Spring Reverb?

Can You Tell Which is a Fender ’65 Reissue Deluxe Reverb Amplifier and Which is The True Spring Reverb?

Our man Andy Martin over at Reverb.com just dropped an outstanding True Spring Reverb video. The video offers a blind comparison between the spring reverb and opto tremolo effects of our new True Spring Reverb pedal and those of a Fender ’65 Reissue Deluxe Reverb amplifier. Do you think you can tell which is which? Please go to the YouTube comments section and let us know what you think.

Andy Compares The True Spring Reverb with A Fender Deluxe Reverb

Also be sure and check out the Reverb.com blog for a brief history lesson on the development of spring reverb and where it stands today. We took great care in preserving the amazing qualities of vintage spring reverb tanks and the classic forms of guitar amp tremolo during the development of True Spring Reverb. We couldn’t be happier with how the pedal sounds, and the reaction we’ve heard from the first wave to True Spring owners has been amazing. Huge THANKS to all of y’all!

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API 1608 Console at Center of Westlake Pro’s New Nashville Location

API 1608 Console at Center of Westlake Pro’s New Nashville Location

COTOBER 2018; JESSUP, MD: API is pleased to announce the installation of a 16 channel 1608 demo console at our longtime dealer Westlake Pro’s new Nashville location.

“API & Nashville go back many years to when Chet Atkins managed RCA Studio B,” says Westlake Pro’s Chad Evans. “That combination resulted in hundreds of hit records so it was a no-brainer to place an API 1608 console at the center of Westlake’s facility!”

Westlake Pro Nashville, which carries API’s full product line, celebrated its grand opening last month and, according to Chad Evans, the company’s new Nashville base has been a long time coming.

“Everyone at Westlake Pro is excited to open the doors of our cutting edge showroom to the Nashville market,” says Evans. “Westlake’s 50 year history of designing studios and selling equipment is exactly the kind of experience the professionals in Music City deserve.” 

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Sequential Announces Prophet XL Synthesizer, Featuring 76-Note Keyboard & Expanded Polyphony

Sequential Announces Prophet XL Synthesizer, Featuring 76-Note Keyboard & Expanded Polyphony

Sequential today announced the Prophet XL, a 76-key version of their flagship Prophet X samples-plus-synthesis hybrid synth. The new instrument provides the same powerful combination of high-fidelity samples from 8Dio and full synthesi s capabilities that has earned the Prophet X critical acclaim — but makes the concept even more compelling for studio and stage by adding a semi-weighted-action, 76-key, premium-quality Fatar keybed and a new performance mode that allows 32-voice polyphony when using a single sampled instrument and a single oscillator.

At the heart of both the Prophet XL and the Prophet X is a sound engine that powers two simultaneous 16-bit, 48kHz sample-based instruments plus two high-resolution digital oscillators with waveshape modulation — all processed through analog filters. In standard performance mode, the instrument provides bi-timbra l, 8-voice-stereo, or 16-voice mono operation.

Dave Smith commented: “We designed the Prophet XL for musicians who wanted more of a good thing. By adding an extended, semi-weighted action keyboard and enabling 32-voice performance mode, we’ve made it even more satisfying to play the acoustic and electric pianos and other instruments where increased polyphony is crucial. We’re making 32-voice mode available on the Prophet X, as well, so that all of our users will benefit.”

Sample content for the Prophet X series was created by sound developers 8Dio, known for pioneering “deep sampling.” Regarding the new instrument, 8Dio co-founder Troels Folmann said: “For us, it’s all about giving musicians the best tools to express themselves. The Prophet XL is a great enhancement of the original Prophet X concept because it gives artists more room to breathe. More keys and more voices means more room to explore and create.”

The 150 GB sample library in the Prophet XL and Prophet X includes numerous acoustic and electronic instruments as well as an extensive collection of ambient and cinematic effects. Users can shape the samples through loop manipulation, sample stretching, and the synthesizer’s many sound-sculpting functions which include 4 envelope generators, 4 LFOs, a deep modulation matrix, and other tools. The Prophet XL and Prophet X also provide 50 gigabytes of internal storage for importing additional samples. Support for user-created sample content is planned for December, 2018.

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Avantone Pro Announces the New CLA-200 Studio Power Amp

Avantone Pro Announces the New CLA-200 Studio Power Amp

The Avantone Pro CLA-200 Studio Reference Amplifier is a classically designed Class A/B amplifier. We took particular care to create an amplifier in the traditional studio style, with generous VU meters, high quality Japanese components and a serious toroidal transformer linear power supply. In a standard 2U rack mount chassis, this amplifier can generate over 200 watts per channel into an 8 ohm load, making it perfect for medium to large speakers in a studio environment. The CLA200 is convection cooled – no fan noise, so it can be used in the same room as the monitors.

The CLA-200 Studio Reference Amplifier is designed to be used in a studio environment requiring high power output with no fan noise. Under testing, it delivers a powerful 208 watts into 8 ohms and can run at one third power without thermal fault.

The CLA-200 was designed to be paired with the CLA-10 studio monitors, but it can be used with just about any demanding speaker load. Very low distortion, steady performance under harsh conditions, and an open and transparent sound make this an obvious choice for discerning studios.

Engineering Objectives

The Avantone Pro CLA-200 Studio Reference Amplifier is a dynamic, high output, high resolution, full-range system built the old school way. We included no-compromise components in a 2U convection cooled chassis to complement our CLA-10 Studio Reference Monitors. Of course, it can be used with any passive studio monitor requiring serious dynamic range.

Check it out at AES in booth #340 

Specifications
Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz +/- 0.5dB
Output power:
200W at 8 ohms
300W at 4 ohms
500W bridged into 8 ohms
Distortion: <0.05%
Signal to Noise: >94dB
Input Impedance: (Balanced) 20KΩ (Unbalanced) 10kΩ
Damping Factor (100Hz, 8Ω): 250Signal to Noise Ratio (A Weighted): >103dB
Amplifier: Class AB
Slew rate (at 1KHz): 28V/us
Input Sensitivity (1KHz): 0.775V (0dBU)
Total Harmonic Distortion (1KHz): <0.1%
Intermodulation distortion (at 10% rated power 1KHz): <0.1%
Crosstalk: -70dB
8Ω Stereo Power (1KHz): 200W
4Ω Stereo Power (1KHz): 300W
8Ω Bridge Power (1KHz): 500W
Cabinet Dimensions: 19”w x 18”d x 3.5”h 30.4 lbs
Weight: 20kg (44lb)

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API Announces New 1608-II and 2448 Recording and Mixing Consoles

API Announces New 1608-II and 2448 Recording and Mixing Consoles

API Audio remains at the forefront of the analog console domain with their newest offering, the 1608-II and the 2448 recording consoles. Drawing on the heritage of their classic 2488 console, which dominated the LA recording world in the 1970s and 1980s, API Audio has brought out a worthy successor to the legend.

The API Audio 2448 is a fully analog console that injects a host of modern features into the rich history of API console design. All analog, all day long – this is a realm that API knows like no other. The console features a twin audio path design: 2 complete audio paths in every channel, for true ‘inline’ simultaneous analog tracking and monitoring.

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TapeOp Review: Lynx: Aurora(n) Interface

TapeOp Review: Lynx: Aurora(n) Interface

Good digital conversion has come a long way in a relatively short time. There are now so many great options, ranging from streamlined 2-channel desktop interfaces and modular systems all the way up to multichannel I/Os that serve the needs of large format professional studios. Lynx is not new to the game, consistently building top-of-the-line converters for audio tracking, mixing, playback, and mastering needs for over 20 years. The latest offering from Lynx is their Aurora(n). Lynx continues to use swappable LSlot cards with their Hilo [Tape Op #90] and original Aurora [#73] interfaces. They’ve carried on that LSlot technology to the Aurora(n) and have introduced several new modules that allow you to configure the interface to fit your workflow. These can be configured at the time of purchase (lynxstudio.com/custom-shop) or upgraded later. This modular system (when using the LSlot for computer connectivity, paired with firmware updating) makes the Aurora(n) essentially “future proof.” Currently swappable LSlot cards are available for USB, Thunderbolt, Pro Tools | HD, and Dante.

My single rack space review unit came configured with 32×32 I/O (also available in 8×8, 16×16 and 24×24 versions) with a Thunderbolt LSlot card. Because I planned on using the Aurora(n) with both with my newer Apple laptop and my older Mac Pro tower setup, Lynx also sent me an LT-HD LSlot card (for my Pro Tools | HD system) that I could swap out for the Thunderbolt card. The analog line inputs and outputs are connected via DB-25s on the back panel. The back panel also sports BNC connectors (1 in and 3 out) to an ultra-low jitter word clock. Different rear module configurations and combinations allow you to customize your entire I/O, within reason. Lynx currently offers a 4-channel mic pre with A/D (LM-PRE4), an 8-channel analog I/O (LM-AIO8), and a 16-channel AES/EBU digital I/O module (LM-DIG) with more options on the way. Setting up was “plug and play.” Simple changes to my DAW’s I/O configuration were all that I needed for use with laptop via the Thunderbolt LSlot card, and, when switching to the LT-HD LSlot to integrate with my older Mac Pro / Pro Tools 10 [#86] system with HD Accel cards, the converter appeared seamlessly as a compatible 192 device (more on this later)!

The real highlight of the Aurora(n) is its sound, due in part to the analog signal path for each channel that has been designed as a self-contained and shielded circuit. Plus, each channel pair has its own dedicated conversion device. This offers the sonic advantage of reducing crosstalk and distortion while significantly increasing dynamic range and performance, resulting in transparent imaging and detail. HCT (Hilo Converter Technology), which borrows the mastering grade conversion design of the Lynx Hilo, makes up the core of the Aurora(n).

But how does the Aurora(n) sound? In a word: awesome! It’s uncolored, and elements of my mixes were presented with what I perceived as more of their own “space.” After working on a mix for several hours, I found myself using less EQ and reverb. Maybe we had done such a fantastic job of recording it that it was unnecessary, but regardless, with this clarity I knew that I was making informed choices. Stereo imaging was solid and the sound stage expansive. With any conversion, my preference is to not hear it. I just want to be confident that what I am hearing is not being altered in the conversion process. If something needs grit, great! I can add it. If the low end of a track needs to be tidied up, I want to have a crystal clear idea of just how much. The Aurora(n) delivered on all fronts in this regard, and I worked more efficiently when using the Lynx.

Another standout feature of this unit is that microSD recording is built-in. When you are tracking, and the band plays that magical idea during a run through of a song, you won’t miss it – even if your DAW wasn’t actively recording or, worse yet, crashes in the middle of a take! This is a great safety net and dummy check. Imagine the uses (and redundancy) for live show recordings…

Front panel function buttons control a menu that provides easy navigation of the LED display, which offers two main metering options: stereo or multichannel. Here the user has the option to route pairs of audio outputs to the SD recorder or to the two built-in, fantastic sounding, audiophile grade headphone outputs with individual level controls. Without referencing the manual, it was easy to understand and operate.

Due to the compact form factor for all this I/O, the Aurora(n) makes for a great mobile rig option that is a snap to throw into a manageable rack along with some preamps and select outboard gear. Because of the SD recorder onboard, you could skip the computer altogether and just record straight to the card, noting however you have no DAW control functions beyond record and stop. All tracks from the microSD card can be dragged right into your favorite DAW for editing later!

Swapping out the Thunderbolt LSlot card for the supplied LT-HD LSlot card was very easy; a screwdriver was all I needed. I especially wanted to audition this option because I am sure that not everyone that’s upgrading converters will want to completely replace their computer, software, etc. The thing that sucks about working in the digital realm is that a single update of a system component is almost never just that, but rather an extensive and expensive endeavor. Set up was straightforward, and, as mentioned earlier, with a few adjustments in Pro Tools, the system saw the Aurora(n) as a compatible 192 I/O. I ate up all my I/O options with analog connections, but, with the use of some mults and patchbay magic, I was working in the same way I had for years – only it sounded markedly better.

Gear at this level doesn’t come cheap. A maxed out 32×32 Aurora(n)configuration will run about $5600, which, in my opinion, is a more than fair price if you never have to think about buying another converter – well worth the cost for its high-quality and uncompromising audio. Comparing the Aurora(n) to other converters in its class is like comparing bad-ass sports cars. They look great and are fast as hell, so it’s just a matter of taste really. With that in mind, the Aurora(n)’s ability to integrate future forms of connectivity makes it a stand out amongst the others.